portfolio

portfolio

Articles

articles | videos

Date: Jan 28, 2016

Publication: Daily Emerald

(The article received a second place award for Best Feature Story by the Oregon Newspaper Publishers Association in the 2016 Collegiate Newspaper Contest.)

The Campbell Club’s dish drainer was “fucked.”

“I cut through the pipe and gallons of stagnant sink waste started spraying out,” said Waldo Przekop, the job and maintenance coordinator at the University of Oregon’s oldest co-op.

Drenched in foul-smelling fluid, Przekop ran to fellow co-opper Jimi Wood for help.

“He comes upstairs covered in straight poop water like, ‘Jimi help me!’ ” said Wood.

Wood toweled off Przekop’s face and the two of them rushed downstairs to fix the dish system. After much trial and error, they managed to get it running again.

“But people still throw food in the sink,” Przekop said, laughing.

They could have called a plumber, but the Campbell Club is already $17,000 in debt. If the clubbers can’t scrounge this amount together by March 20, the co-op will be shut down by the Student Cooperative Association, its overseeing body.

view/download PDF view on web

Date: Jan 11, 2016

Publication: Daily Emerald

I was 14 years old when I first heard Changesbowie, David Bowie’s 1990 retrospective, and I’d just started 8th grade. For me at the time, music didn’t exist independent of the radio and my parents’ CD collection. I’d never heard Bowie except for “Changes” in Shrek 2. But something clicked with me when I heard this compilation, now much-maligned if only because of its inferior remix of “Fame.” In fact, it clicked with me so hard that I sat down at my parents’ long-since-retired desktop computer and dashed out a review – the first I ever wrote, which I’d publish in my tiny, scarcely read high school newsletter a few days later.

At that time, I thought sexuality in music was Motley Crue wolf-whistling on the Sunset Strip. Prince had piqued my pubescent nerves, but he was too scary and esoteric to do much for me. David Bowie was – well, a lot like me. He was human. For all his ineffable alien cool, “Suffragette City,” “John I’m Only Dancing,” “Let’s Dance,” even “Heroes” worked because of his uncontrolled excitement. He didn’t treat matters of the heart with jaded cynicism but with the same curiosity, delight and genuine fascination I felt myself as a gay 14-year-old kid who’d only had maybe six crushes at the time. He made me feel comfortable in my queer, pubescent skin, this fey little elf-man dancing around my dad’s stereo.

view/download PDF view on web

Date: Nov 10, 2015

Publication: Daily Emerald

Slime Season 2 is the first Young Thug mixtape where it’s pretty easy to tell what’s on his mind. The Atlanta rapper’s style is still proudly idiosyncratic, but it’s familiar by now, and anyone who’s heard even just one other Thug release will be able to trace some of his flows and ad-libs back to earlier songs. This is not a groundbreaking release, and it doesn’t teach us much new about Thugger. But it’s an exemplary one, a few steps up from the scattershot first Slime Season.

The main difference is the raised emotional stakes. He talks in dark terms about his love life, his self-consciously unfeeling sex narrative on “Phoenix” evoking molly-era robo-Romeos like the Weeknd or Future. He dazzlingly empathizes with Lois Griffin on “Hey I” for putting up with Peter’s antics, much as his own girlfriend has to put up with his shit. He references his brother Bennie’s murder on two songs. He’s talked about the deaths in his family before, most notably on early cut “R.I.P.,” but he’s never laid his feelings so consistently bare over the length of an entire tape.

view/download PDF view on web

Date: Jul 09, 2015

Publication: San Francisco Magazine

It’s the final night for SUB-Mission. In the shadow of towering, psychedelic murals in the back courtyard, teens and older punks light smokes, laugh, yell, and get ready for the multi-band blowout that will be the last for the Mission’s beloved punk rock venue.

Two in the crowd—Fabrizio Incerti, drummer/vocalist for psychedelic rock band Clumsy, and his friend Sam Velarde—suggest rallying slogans for the soon-to-be-scattered contingent of SUB-Mission regulars. “#Submissioninexile” is Incerti’s suggestion; Velarde’s is simply “Free SUB-Mission!”

SUB-Mission began as an art gallery known as Balazo 18, but it soon expanded to hosting local and small touring bands. Most shows are only $5, in line with the venue’s adamantly non-profit stance. But with rents in the Mission skyrocketing, non-profit began to mean non-viable. “The landlord was willing to negotiate, but he wanted to charge $40,000 just to sit and talk with him,” said the current space manager, who goes by Kay Two. (We asked for his real name and he told us “Lou Sypher,” so that’ll teach us.) “That wasn’t guaranteeing we had a lease when the meeting was over. So we decided not to burn that money.”

 

 

view/download PDF view on web

Date: May 06, 2015

Publication: Daily Emerald

Following their near-legendary 2013 gig at the W.O.W. Hall, Unknown Mortal Orchestra is back for more. Portland’s favorite psych-pop power trio will return to the W.O.W. this Thursday to promote their new record, Multi-Love. Prior to the band’s arrival in Eugene, singer-guitarist Ruban Nielson sat with the Emerald to discuss what fans can expect from the band’s next show and new material.

view/download PDF view on web

Date: Apr 02, 2015

Publication: Daily Emerald

As far as album concepts go, it’s hard to beat the one behind Eugene funk band Soul Vibrator’sElectric Stardust. An alien lands on Earth from a planet that has lost the art of music and discovers vinyl and cassettes; enamored, he rockets back to his home planet and saves rock ‘n’ roll. It’s as supremely goofy as the motley crew who made it.

“We wanted something spacey, cartoon-y, because that’s who we are as people,” said bassist Miles Alberts, face buried in a gargantuan bag of kettle chips as he and his fellow band members lounge on their friend Andy Hudson’s back porch. The band is taking a well-deserved rest before packing up for three shows on the Oregon Coast as part of its ongoing Electric Stardust tour.

Indeed, hanging out with Soul Vibrator is a lot like being in a cartoon. The band members exchange words effortlessly, and almost everything they say is funny. They also have strikingly distinct personalities. Alberts talks with the pep and clarity of a football coach. Drummer Sam Hayward, with his impressive mustache and dry sense of humor, could be a TV cop. Saxophonist Ben Latimer and trombonist Charles DeMonnin are quiet but occasionally say something hilarious. Keyboardist Alvin Johnson is a jokester. Singer Zev Kamrat is at lunch with his girlfriend.

view/download PDF view on web

Date: Aug 12, 2014

Publication: San Francisco Bay Guardian

While still a child in early­’80s San Francisco, Boots Riley witnessed something he didn’t quite understand but that would stick with him for the rest of his life. Walking into a theater performance at the venerable Mission District art space Project Artaud (http://www.projectartaud.org/) , Riley saw actors in body paint writhing around him in apparent agony on all sides. It was meant as a simulation of the AIDS epidemic, with the actors portraying the afflicted. But it didn’t enlighten him much as a kid.
“It just scared the hell out of me,” Riley recalls. “You walk into this place, and it’s like a whole city, with people all around you.”

view/download PDF

Date: Jul 02, 2014

Publication: San Francisco Bay Guardian

America’s Auto­Tune rapper du jour, is in a cushy position. His recent album Honest is one of the year’s most critically acclaimed rap
albums so far, and it’s moved enough units to establish him as a
major presence on 2014’s hip­hop scene. Hip­hop fans know who he
is, as do a lot of indie kids who’ve stumbled across fawning reviews
of his work online. But he’s not yet a star.

As such, he doesn’t get a lot of high­ profile hate. His most notable detractor is his direct stylistic predecessor, T­Pain, who’s expressed resentment towards the acclaim Future’s garnered through his use of
the same software T­Pain was so often mocked for during his own career heyday. AutoTune was — and still is — viewed by musical conservatives as a crutch, a fancy tool for artists who couldn’t sing and were thus “talentless.” Along with laptop DJing and lipsynching, it is one of the most likely factors anyone will cite in arguing music has gotten worse.

view/download PDF

Date: Jun 26, 2014

Publication: San Francisco Bay Guardian

Just over a year ago, Adam Tod Brown wrote a great article for Cracked called “4 Classic Albums That Get More Praise Than They Deserve.
(http://www.cracked.com/blog/4­classicalbums­that­get­more­praise­than­theydeserve/) ” Though it contained as much Yoko Ono­bashing as you’d
expect from a website as frequently fratty as Cracked, it made a great argument for Ringo’s self­titled as the best solo ’70s Beatles album and
contributed substantially to the recent critical revival of Neil Young’s On The Beach. The thing that interested me most, however, was Brown’s citation of Prince’s Purple Rain as a “flawless album” that gets as much press as it deserves, “no matter how many other great Prince albums there are.”

view/download PDF

Date: Nov 20, 2011

Publication: SF Rebirth

It would be an understatement to call Nick Martin a perfectionist. During a pre-gig rehearsal in a crowded, dimly lit room at San Francisco’s Lennon Studios, Martin, leader of R&B ensemble Romance of Thieves, is dissatisfied, and he has the horn section squarely in his sights. “You guys don’t have your shit down!” shouts Martin, 16. “Paul’s only been in the band five days, and he knows his shit better than either of you guys!” He gestures towards newly recruited bassist Paul Mallari, who watches while noodling nervously on his bass.
The horn section, comprising brothers Jonah (trumpet) and Aaron (saxophone) Baker-McCann, seems a bit puzzled. They’re not getting things quite right, but neither can figure out what they’re doing wrong, and Martin doesn’t seem inclined to give much in the way of direction. The other band members choose not to intervene. They recognize Martin’s leadership and implicitly understand that he may be the only guy in the room who knows what the horn part is supposed to sound like.

The tension mounts, and within about ten seconds, Martin and Jonah Baker-McCann are in the midst of a shouting match, which mixes with the other band members’ noodling to create an unbearably awkward cacophony. Jonah threatens to quit; Martin ignores his threats. Finally, Jonah packs up his trumpet and walks right out the door.

view/download PDF view on web

Videos

articles | videos

“Know Your Weed”

This video was created for my Comedy and Media Class for the University of Oregon School of Journalism, a class focusing on the role of comedy in society and political discourse. Our assignment was to highlight a social or political issue and make a five-minute comedy video relating to that issue; we chose the legalization of marijuana in Oregon. I conceived of the concept for this video and co-wrote the script with fellow student Blake Marancik in addition to acting in several roles, including the stoner in the car and the son at the beginning (in the wig).

“It’s A Protest: Keeping Whoville Alive”

This video was created for my Reporting II class for the University of Oregon School of Journalism. Again, we were assigned to highlight an issue. After meeting Ryan Stearns collecting cans outside my house, I decided to profile him and the Whoville homeless encampment in Eugene. I shot the footage, edited the video and audio, conducted the interviews, and composed and recorded the music for this clip myself.