blog

That Louise Belcher wants to turn the restaurant into a casino is the funniest thing in “The Kids Run The Restaurant,” the 20th episode of the third season of Bob’s Burgers. That might seem odd to anyone who hasn’t familiarized themselves with the show, but the best comedy on Loren Bouchard’s animated sitcom comes once we’ve internalized the characters and understand what they’re doing and why they’re doing it in any given situation. In this case, Bob’s cut his hand and Linda’s driving him to the hospital, leaving the restaurant closed. The kids get mischievous and decide to reopen it…

Read More

Share

– King Ghidorah was the best thing in the movie. I loved the icky head regeneration, I loved the way the heads slither unwholesomely and rear up almost orgasmically whenever it’s about to attack, and I loved how big it is. – I did think, though, that they could’ve taken more of a Jaws approach to it. I understand they’re hesitant because of the backlash to the 2014 Godzilla, and I didn’t have a problem with the other monsters being introduced five minutes in, but Ghidorah is really supposed to be the monster to end all monsters and he was……

Read More

Share

This review was originally published on the website of Solace, a clothing brand and culture site that’s since folded, in October of last year. This is not meant to represent my current feelings on the album. I disagree with some of the statements I made here. “Cold Coffee & Cocaine” has grown on me a lot, and I’m not entirely sure the record was released for the reasons I posited in my opening paragraph. I’ve also noticed so, so much more in the dozen or so times I’ve heard the album since writing this review. A more comprehensive review will appear in my…

Read More

Share

Even battle rappers will tell you battle rappers don’t usually make good music. Eyedea fans would disagree, but even “Big Shot,” impressive as it is, hinges mostly on a contest-winning switcheroo. The problem is even though everyone knows guys like Mac Lethal can twist syllables like nobody’s business, they still feel like they need to prove it. Once skill becomes your selling point, it’s hard to sacrifice it for artistry. Which is why Tierra Whack’s music is so impressive. She isn’t a battle rapper, but she’s from the same wheelhouse. She came up with Internet-busting freestyles as Dizzle Dizz, but…

Read More

Share

The joke on George and James isn’t how bad or clichéd or ridiculous the Residents think James Brown’s Live at the Apollo is but how good it knows it is. It assumes you understand what a herculean zenith of showmanship, sequencing, singing, and songwriting that record is. Then it turns down the power. The crowd is suspended in space. James Brown is an arthritic robot. The Famous Flames are squabbling birds. Chords that should be major sour distressingly into minor. The horns are what you hear when your dryer is done. Handclaps are as wet and disgusting as the slap…

Read More

Share

I made a major indulgence in compiling my favorite albums for 2018, which I’ll hope you’ll forgive. I put Piano & A Microphone 1983, the inaugural release from the Prince vault, in my top 10. I debated for some time whether or not to consider it a reissue, but as the music had not yet been released, I ultimately decided to count it as an album alongside newly recorded and released material. I suspect, though this is far from the best thing in the Prince vault, and if a release at this level of quality came out every year we’d…

Read More

Share

Eric Renner Brown from Entertainment Weekly, whom I follow on Twitter, noticed it at about the same time I did: there haven’t been a lot of truly great albums this year, but there have been more good ones than usual. None of these albums are ones I’m unlikely to turn to in the future. Often I get past six or seven on a year-end list and wonder what these albums I’m putting on there even are. I named Vashti Bunyan’s Heartleap my sixth favorite album of 2014, I think, and I haven’t listened to it since at least then. But…

Read More

Share

The Last Jedi was pretty much what I imagined it’d be, except better. I anticipated it’d start out kind of like The Empire Strikes Back, then go off the rails. I was right—though to be fair I knew it had its share of twists and turns from the headlines of the reviews that’ve come out thus far. The reviews don’t reveal anything more, of course. Most writing on the film so far has been a drag to read, not because of any lack of talent on the part of the writers but because Lucasfilm goes through great pains to avoid…

Read More

Share

Funkentelechy: The Placebo Syndrome, Parliament’s sixth album, came out forty years today. Here are some of my retrospective thoughts on it. About a year ago I played Parliament’s “Flash Light” to a dear friend of mine who likes classic ‘90s rap—probably more than I do—but doesn’t quite share in my love of funk. His reaction was incredulous. “Is Snoop Dogg just ripping off George Clinton?” Well, of course he is. Snoop Dogg was born in 1971, and he grew up with Clinton’s Parliament-Funkadelic empire as they found new ways to wiggle their wormy tentacles into the pop world. He would have been…

Read More

Share

I never thought of “Starfish and Coffee”—that sweet, mysterious song—as a children’s song until I saw Prince perform it on Sesame Street with the Muppets. It makes perfect sense as one: it’s got a simple melody and silly lyrics, and it’s set in a schoolhouse. I guess its psychedelia was the main reason I never saw it that way. I associated it with something as adult as acid rather than as innocent as a nursery rhyme. But I guess all kids’ songs are kind of psychedelic, and all psychedelic songs are kind of childish. Often explicitly so. The Beatles count three songs…

Read More

Share
* indicates required
How often would you like to receive this email? *